“Review into the Future for Local Government”

“Review into the Future for Local Government”
https://www.futureforlocalgovernment.govt.nz/

“Review into the Future for Local Government”: Interim Report
https://www.futureforlocalgovernment.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/DIA_16724_Te-Arotake-Future-of-Local-Government_Interim-report_22.pdf

The wellbeing dimension (Page 17-24)
“The future wellbeing of New Zealand communities depends at least in part on effective local governance. Under the Local Government Act 2002, one of the purposes of local government is to promote social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing in local communities.
This review is being conducted to determine how local authorities might need to evolve in order to deliver on that purpose over the next 30 years.
Under current local governance arrangements, local authorities make significant contributions to local wellbeing, but neither they nor central government on their own can address the most significant wellbeing issues facing local communities, or to address all of the challenges that might emerge in the future.
A more collaborative approach will be necessary in future to meet these challenges and create conditions in which communities can thrive over the next three decades.
The vast bulk of local government spending is focused on infrastructure, the environment, and facilities and services – including…facilities such as libraries, and community and recreation centres.
These facilities and services play critical roles in local wellbeing. They provide for basic needs; keep people healthy and safe; allow people to move around and connect with each other; enable work and business activity; support family, neighbourhood and community connections; and create environments in which people can exercise and relax. An attractive, well-functioning physical and natural environment can lift mood, reflect identity, create a sense of belonging, and attract skills, tourism and commerce.”


LIANZA “Libraries and the Future of Local Government Review Panel”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViiMtWcPlys


Below is my email to the “Review into the Future for Local Government” Panel:

Hi

Last night I watched the LIANZA “Libraries and the Future of Local Government” public panel discussion & listened to Gael Surgenor speak about the review.
https://www.librariesaotearoa.org.nz/korero-blog/library-and-the-future-of-local-government-review-panel-27-june

Below is an overview of my “Learning Libraries” concept (Library with Learning Spaces: Community Education & Support Services):
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/shirley-centre-concept-image/


“In community building, the third place is the social surroundings separate from the two usual social environments of home (“first place”) and the workplace (“second place”).
Examples of third places would be environments such as churches, cafes, clubs, public libraries, bookstores or parks. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_place
In his influential book The Great Good Place, Ray Oldenburg (1989, 1991) argues that third places are important for civil society, democracy, civic engagement, and establishing feelings of a sense of place.
Third places, then, are “anchors” of community life and facilitate and foster broader, more creative interaction.”

We have many in our communities who don’t have a ‘second place (work)’: stay at home parents, caregivers, retirees, unemployed, people unable to work due to chronic illness, people working from home etc.
Some due to their circumstances don’t feel like they have a safe and relaxing ‘first place (home)’.
This is why it is so important that our ‘third places (social)’ are welcoming, inclusive & accessible for everyone in our communities.

“Urban planners seeking to stabilize neighborhoods are focusing on the critical role that “third places” can play in strengthening our sense of community.
Third places have a number of important community-building attributes.
Depending on their location, social classes and backgrounds can be “leveled-out” in ways that are unfortunately rare these days, with people feeling they are treated as social equals.
Informal conversation is the main activity and most important linking function. One commentator refers to third places as the “living room” of society.
Many city planning efforts to reinvigorate metropolitan neighborhoods now include specific steps to create third places, especially public spaces, to try and break down social siloes.”
https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-front/2016/09/14/third-places-as-community-builders

“The public library is the one place, potentially the only civic place, where people are welcome to come no matter their background, their politics, their beliefs.
People who are disenfranchised, have mobility issues, are socially isolated, the very old and the very young, it can be the only comfortable place to be – and their ideas are welcome.”
“We are becoming a bastion of wellbeing and welcome for people,” says Kat Cuttriss, Hutt City Libraries manager and chair of Public Libraries of New Zealand.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/books/113926856/how-new-zealand-libraries-are-adapting-to-the-21st-century

“Social infrastructure provides the setting and context for social participation, and the library is among the most critical forms of social infrastructure that we have.
It’s also one of the most undervalued…Our communities are full of children whose future, will be formed in the places where they go to learn about themselves and the world they’ll inherit. They deserve palaces. Whether they get them is up to us.”
“Palaces for the People: How To Build a More Equal and United Society” by Eric Klinenberg
https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2018/sep/24/palaces-for-the-people-at-the-library-everyone-is-welcome

“Tangata ako ana i te kāenga, te tūranga ki te marae, tau ana.
A person nurtured in the community contributes strongly to society.”

When we know who we are (identity), what we need to be healthy (well-being), and the importance of a growth mindset (learning), this causes a positive ripple effect in our businesses, communities and economy.

“Inā kei te mohio koe ko wai koe, I anga mai koe i hea, kei te mohio koe. Kei te anga atu ki hea.
If you know who you are and where you are from, then you will know where you are going.”

https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/CCCDraftAnnualPlan2020JoannaGould.pdf
Page 3-5: Canterbury Wellbeing Index
Page 6: Original Learning Libraries Concept

The Christchurch City Council has set the bar high on how to create architectural award winning libraries & community centres.
What if Christchurch City Council also set the example for what happens inside?
What happens inside the library has more impact on our communities. How?
By creating Learning Libraries: citizen hubs where community education is the centre & the learning spaces are utilised by the Govt/CCC/Organisations as a central outreach to the residents in the surrounding communities.
Learning Libraries are ‘schools in the community for everyone, all ages & stages of life are welcome.’
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/learning-libraries-concept/

Instore demonstrations work with the flow of people in a supermarket & are positioned accordingly. Shoppers usually have one of three reactions:
1. Participate (stop & engage with demonstrator),
2. Engage (walk passed & take what is handed to them by the demonstrator),
3. Observe (watches & listens by shelves close to the demonstrator)

The same principles would work if we integrated support services into our library learning spaces:
1. Participate: support services can invite residents to learn more about their services or hold weekly/monthly meetings.
2. Engage: support services ‘demonstrators’ become a familiar face, in residents local ‘safe’ place, more accessible ‘bumping’ space.
3. Observe: residents are now aware of this support service, they might not need their help at this time or they might remember this support services & refer someone else to it.
Residents might not be comfortable approaching ‘demonstrators’ in a public place & may reach out to the support service in private.
Some residents who have trust issues, will need to see the support service or ‘demonstrator’ more than once, before they decide it is ‘safe’ to ‘participate’ or ‘engage’.
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/instore-demonstration-concept/

https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/community-education/

If “Reading is the gateway skill that makes all other learning possible.” (Barack Obama), why is it so hard for people who struggle to read, to get the help & support they need?
There are tools available (like the different coloured plastic in this video), so why aren’t we sharing this knowledge in our Christchurch City Libraries?
https://fb.watch/dXA5h3M_WF/

https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/support-services/

“The accessible physical space of the library is not the only factor that makes it work well as social infrastructure.
The institution’s extensive programming, organized by a professional staff that upholds a principled commitment to openness and inclusivity, fosters social cohesion among clients who might otherwise keep to themselves…
Why have so many public officials and civic leaders failed to recognize the value of libraries and their role in our social infrastructure?
Perhaps it’s because the founding principle behind the library—that all people deserve free, open access to our shared culture and heritage, which they can use to any end they see fit—is out of sync with the market logic that dominates our time…
Their core mission is to help people elevate themselves and improve their situation. Libraries do this, principally, by providing free access to the widest possible variety of cultural materials to people of all ages, from all ethnicities and groups.”
“Palaces for the People: How To Build a More Equal and United Society” by Eric Klinenberg

Libraries are usually the first place new people to an area will go to for information/help, as they are often centrally located in our communities & accessible by public transport.
Our librarians are information specialists. They are often the first public servant our babies meet & our children grow up knowing that it’s ok to ask a librarian for help.

I’ve been advocating since 2018 for a new building to be built on 10 Shirley Road, after our former Shirley Primary School/Shirley Community Centre was demolished in 2012 due to earthquake damage.
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/where-is-our-community-centre-petition/
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/poto-williams-support-letter/
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/duncan-webb-support-letter/

The former Shirley Community Centre was a historic building, used for Cultural, Educational and Recreational Activities.
Prior to the September 4, 2010, and February 22, 2011 earthquakes, the well-established centre was used by many community groups.
The Shirley Library (built in 1995), has become our community centre by default & is located in the carpark of The Palms mall (Burwood Ward).
The building is smaller than most ‘suburban’ libraries in Christchurch, with the Shirley Library, Service Centre/NZ Post & Coastal-Burwood Governance unit sharing this space.
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/RichmondResearchJoannaGould.pdf
Page 1-2: Identity, Well-being, Learning, Shirley Library & 10 Shirley Road

https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/shirley-centre-overview/
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/design-considerations/
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ShirleyCentreConcept2021JoannaGould.pdf

There is no suburban library in the Innes Ward. The ward boundary size will decrease in the October 2022 elections, due to the population increase in social housing & infill housing in these areas.
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/CCCDraftAnnualPlan2022JoannaGould.pdf
Page 6, ReVision Youth Audit Shirley Library
Shirley Library is still considered the second busiest suburban library in Christchurch, even without dedicated learning spaces (limited after school/holiday programmes) & meeting rooms.
“It [South] is the third-busiest suburban library, behind Fendalton and Shirley, with 4552 weekly visitors.”
https://i.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/128047707/earthquake-repairs-spell-18month-closure-of-popular-christchurch-library

From a potential disaster/civil defence point of view, a standalone civic building at 10 Shirley Road, opposite our largest school (Shirley Primary) would also provide a central emergency location (with solar panels & rainwater harvesting system).
The Palms was closed for over six months due to earthquake repairs. Fences and containers at Shirley Library: https://canterburystories.nz/collections/community/ginahubert/ccl-cs-22611
https://hauora.co.nz/assets/files/Resources/Final%20Report%20to%20HRC%20-%20Building%20Community%20Resilience.pdf
“Building Community Resilience: Learning from the Canterbury earthquakes”, Appendix 2: Shirley Case Study Report, Page 73-85
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/south-library-report/

The communities around Shirley Road have been waiting since 2012 for a new building to be built on 10 Shirley Road.
Why has the Christchurch City Council deferred funding this until 2030/31?

Please let me know if you have any questions,

Joanna Gould

https://www.facebook.com/ShirleyCentre10ShirleyRoad/
(updated daily with research/ideas/organisations/shared posts)


P.S. I forgot to sending this link in my email, to my Shirley Centre research from 2019, on why a new building at 10 Shirley Road is important, a need not a want:
https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/ShirleyCentreResearch2019JoannaGould.pdf

Think: Christchurch with Hila Oren

Thank you Facebook AI engine for suggesting I go to this event:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDjZDEsKNS0

Think: Christchurch with Hila Oren
The Piano: Centre for Music and the Arts
Monday, 10th September 2018
“The following guest speakers will be joining our ‘Thinker in Residence’ on the stage to share their thoughts on how Christchurch, a city of explorers, could leverage our unique selling point.
Simon Hunter | KPMG, Nigel Watson | NZ Antarctic Heritage Trust, Jasina Gurung and Thomas Akolo | Linwood College, Lianne Dalziel | Christchurch Mayor and Tim Loftus | ChristchurchNZ

“Are you an explorer? We think most people from Christchurch are. Come along and hear from some talented and passionate people about where they think being a city of explorers could take Christchurch.”

Christchurch on progressive path
“Christchurch’s first ‘thinker in residence’ believes the city is moving in the right direction. Ms Oren, who is the chief executive of the Tel Aviv Foundation, is considered a global leader in creating a city’s narrative, supporting entrepreneurialism and philanthropy.

She has been brought back to the city for two months by the Christchurch Foundation as the first ‘thinker in residence’ to engage with city leaders, charities and social enterprises on several projects. She has shared her infectious enthusiasm for ‘city making’ at this week’s Think Christchurch workshop, delivering a thought-provoking keynote address.

Ms Oren heard about Antarctic explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton’s expeditions when she was on a leadership programme at Harvard University in the United States.
‘You need to celebrate your links to history and tell the stories of Shackleton, Edmund Hillary, New Zealand’s suffrage leader, Kate Sheppard, and others who have played such a huge part in what your city is today,’ she says.

‘Explorers from all over the world should want to touch Christchurch’s spirit to inspire them.’
‘As to the future, your city is at a crucial stage of considering ‘where to, now’. Even just bringing me from the other side of the world to help you think through ideas demonstrates that you are bold in taking the next step.'”
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/news-and-events/newsline/show/2980

Elevating the City’s Quality of Life
Education | Arts & Culture | Social Services | Innovation | Environment
https://youtu.be/qdaobm0f85w
Building Knowledge | Speaker Series 2017/18 | Hila Oren

My Story…
For me the “Think: Christchurch” event, was inspiring and encouraging, listening to the guest speakers speaking my language, using words I use, talking about a vision for Christchurch similar to mine.
I am a Christchurch resident ‘thinker’. I went to the above event because I have a creative growth mindset. I’ve been listening/learning/researching and creating ideas to help our community.

During this week I’ve read articles/comments regarding this event and listened to: ‘What does a thinker in residence do?’ Chris Lynch/NewstalkZB asked Christchurch Foundation chief executive Amy Carter.
https://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/on-air/christchurch/canterbury-mornings/audio/what-does-a-thinker-in-residence-do/
The irony is that without ‘thinkers’ sharing their thoughts on talkback radio, this radio show wouldn’t exist as it does, the ‘thinkers’ help provide the content.
‘Thinkers’ have value and add value to our communities.

When I started with this ‘project’ https://www.10shirleyroad.org.nz/imagine/ in April 2018, I didn’t have a clue where this journey would take me.

In May 2018 I presented my verbal submission ‘You Are Here’ to the Christchurch City Council’s 2018 Long Term Plan, for the rebuild of the Shirley Community Centre, to create a multi-cultural centre as a ‘Gateway to the East.’

Afterwards I went to the Christchurch Art Gallery for the first time.
I walked through the exhibitions admiring all the artworks, and then I found ‘Our Collection: 19th and 20th Century New Zealand Art’.
The saying goes ‘A picture is worth a thousand words’, but standing in front of the Māori portraits, the 3 words that came into my mind were: ‘Tell Our Stories’.
https://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/1058-historic-2018-changeover

I had been given a map of the Art Gallery, and as I was looking for the name of the Māori portraits exhibition, another name jumped out at me ‘You Are Here’.
It took me awhile to find this in the Outer Spaces. It is a signpost.
“- looking at the influences these artists had drawn on
– related to distance/directions from these artworks to this location
– how isolated we are in NZ and how we draw on influences from outside
– you are here, and what are you going to do about it?
– a challenge to the people of Christchurch post earthquakes”
https://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/events/outer-spaces-guided-tour-with-guest-artist-matt-ak
https://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/multimedia/artist-interviews/matt-akehurst-interviewAC

Christchurch, The Garden City, known for its English heritage, Avon River, Botanic Gardens, Christchurch Cathedral…
“The city suffered a series of earthquakes between September 2010 and early 2012, with the most destructive of them occurring at 12.51 p.m. on Tuesday, 22 February 2011, in which 185 people were killed and thousands of buildings across the city collapsed or suffered severe damage. By late 2013, 1,500 buildings in the city had been demolished, leading to an ongoing recovery and rebuilding project.”
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christchurch

Post earthquakes the people in the East have been waiting/fighting for repairs/rebuilds, our footpaths/roads are ‘munted’, some of our schools have been closed/relocated, and our mental health/well-being has suffered.

The quintessential photo Hila captured of the girls dressed in kilts, walking to school through the trees and daffodils, had me thinking.
– Why was this image important?
– How many of us have driven passed the same scene and thought nothing of it?
– Did you notice their school uniforms? How are they designed?
– Are the girls just talking? Or are they making connections that will last them a lifetime?

Hila is right, we need to start appreciating what we do have.
We need to reframe some of the stories we have been telling ourselves.
Yes the earthquakes happened in Christchurch, we can learn from them and share our learning with others around the world, but they aren’t our identity.

Christchurch is still ‘The Garden City’.
How many photos did you see on social media this weekend, of people admiring the cherry blossom trees in full bloom around Hagley Park?

Yes we are explorers, it is in our DNA, and in our school uniforms (logos, kilts, Māori designs).
Our roots go back to the brave explorers, our Māori people and those who travelled on the First Four Ships. They went on a journey to discover the unknown, to learn more about the world and the new lands they would find.

Standing in the foyer during the break at this event, I was reminded again as we introduced ourselves, a person’s identity in Christchurch is connected to ‘what school did you go to?’

Learning is part of our Christchurch identity.
Our communities are centered around our schools.
Our education connects us to social networks/employment.
We value learning and the places it can take us.
“The MORE that you READ. The more THINGS you will KNOW. The MORE you LEARN. The more PLACES you’ll GO!” – Dr. Seuss

Q. Why is identity, well-being and learning important for our people?
A. When we know who we are (identity), what we need to be healthy (well-being), and the importance of a growth mindset (learning), this causes a positive ripple effect in our businesses, communities and economy.

Through my research I realised the ideas I had created, had a common theme: learning.
Shirley Community Centre: library with learning spaces available for anyone in the community to use
Sutton’s Place: arts/crafts community with learning spaces for local/overseas teachers to provide classes/workshops/retreats, opportunity to learn about W. A. (Bill) Sutton and his teaching/artworks and house/garden
Māori Heritage Park: indoor/outdoor learning spaces for Māori architecture/arts/crafts, opportunities to learn about the Māori language/culture/stories/legends
River Bank Centre: research/design/technology hub with learning spaces to inspire/educate with STEAM, opportunity to see startup/innovation businesses and to learn about Richard Bedward Owen and why he was called ‘River Bank’ Owen.

Q. Why do we need these types of learning facilities in the East?
To inspire/educate the children/teenagers living in the East, who now have fewer options for schools, and limited access to continued learning outside of the schools.
We need to open the eyes of every child in Christchurch to what is possible through learning.
In the south of Christchurch, children/teenagers see those attending Ara Institute of Canterbury.
In the west of Christchurch, children/teenagers see those attending the University of Canterbury.

Our access to knowledge and where our locals have gathered since the earthquakes, is currently hidden in the car park of The Palms, as our Shirley Library.
I see the 10 Shirley Road site (opposite Shirley Primary School) for the rebuild of the Shirley Community Centre, as an opportunity to show our children/teenagers that continued learning is possible once they leave school, and to inspire them to become ‘explorers’ and pursue their dreams.
The rebuild of the Shirley Community Centre represents laying a new foundation stone as the ‘Gateway to the East’, that says ‘we value our children and we value their learning’.
Hila Oren is right ‘it starts with our children’.

“Tangata ako ana i te kāenga, te tūranga ki te marae, tau ana.
A person nurtured in the community contributes strongly to society.”
https://www.facebook.com/ChchFoundation/

We do need to ‘reframe our mindset’. We don’t need to rebuild our communities back to what they were pre earthquakes.
Post earthquakes we have the opportunity to tell the unique stories of our local people, to inspire/educate a new generation, leave a legacy for the generations to come, and to create new spaces/places/attractions, for the local/New Zealand/overseas ‘explorers’.

We need to move forward from ‘Think: Christchurch’ to ‘Get Creative Christchurch’!

“Think: Christchurch with Hila Oren” Post | Links
https://www.telavivfoundation.org/team/hila-oren/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdaobm0f85w Building Knowledge | Speaker Series 2017/18
https://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/106339468/new-thinker-in-residence-announced-for-christchurch
https://www.ccc.govt.nz/news-and-events/newsline/show/2980 Christchurch on progressive path
http://www.metropol.co.nz/creating-global-cities-qa-with-hila-oren/
https://www.newstalkzb.co.nz/on-air/christchurch/canterbury-mornings/audio/what-does-a-thinker-in-residence-do/
https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/106961822/let-it-go-global-thinker-tells-christchurch ‘Let it go’, global thinker tells Christchurch